Exceptional Airways

EMPOWERING

EXCEPTIONAL AIRWAYS

A clinical, individualized approach to breathe better.

METHODS & PHILOSOPHIES

NASAL BREATHING

The nose’s main function is to inhale oxygen that our bodies need to survive. But lack of proper nasal breathing or even sleep disordered breathing leads to incorrect tongue position and function because mouth breathing becomes the primary source of obtaining this necessary oxygen. Mouth breathing can lead to a number of systemic diseases and conditions. Myofunctional therapy’s goal is to re-educate the tongue, lips, and orofacial muscles to facilitate nasal breathing only.
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TONGUE POSTURE

Low tongue posture can lead to poor facial growth and jaw development, post- orthodontic relapse, improper muscle function, and airway obstruction. Tethered oral tissues such as a tongue-tie can also affect tongue position. Myofunctional therapy can retrain the tongue for better posture and function which can lead to optimal growth and development, improved nasal breathing, swallowing, and speech.
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LIP SEAL

Open mouth posture leads to dry lips, low tongue position, mouth breathing and so much more. Establishing an ideal lip seal reinforces proper nasal breathing and swallow patterns. Through the exercises of myofunctional therapy the lips and orofacial muscles can be strengthened to support proper facial development and promote nasal breathing.

TESTIMONIALS

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A FEW WORDS
ABOUT ME

Minette graduated from the University of California Riverside with a BS in Biological Sciences and began her career in the dental field as a Registered Dental Assistant in 2000. She worked in private practice for a few years until she became the Clinical Manager at The Las Vegas Institute and taught in the dental team program for nine years. In 2014, she decided to go to dental hygiene school and later graduated with high honors from the College of Southern Nevada’s Dental Hygiene Program. She is a member of Sigma Phi Alpha Dental Hygiene Honor Society and Alpha Phi Omega National Co-Ed Service Fraternity.

During her college years, she earned several awards and scholarships including the Asian American Award for Excellence in Academics and Leadership, the Academic Excellence Award, and the Deborah Groom Peterman Community Award. In 2018, she was given an Exceptional Performance (XP) Award from Pacific Dental Services and helped conduct multiple RDH study clubs. Minette has given presentations on various topics for dental assistants and hygienists, and was a panelist for the Western Society of Periodontology’s Dental Hygiene Symposium in 2021. She has served as President of the dental hygienists’ association for both the local component and for the state of Nevada. Minette continues to be a lifelong learner and is pursuing her certification for Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy. Minette has always been a strong advocate for giving back to her community. She has volunteered for Remote Area Medical, Give Kids a Smile, and recently was one of the few hygienists to finish training and administered the Covid vaccine. She is an active member of her church and consistently helps at her boys’ school. Minette enjoys cooking, running, arts-n-crafts, shopping, and most importantly spending time with her husband and two boys.

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MY VIDEOS

The core of myofunctional therapy is to create that perfect triad of nasal breathing, tongue posture, and lip seal. As your myofunctional therapist, my goal is to identify and break those bad habits to get you breathing better, functioning better, and ultimately living better. So, come and BREATHE. LIVE. SMILE with me!

Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy FAQs

Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy FAQs

What is myofunctional therapy?
It is the re-education of the oral and facial muscles for optimal breathing, tongue and lip posture.
The goals of myofunctional therapy? *services provided
  • Encourage nasal breathing
  • Promote proper tongue rest position
  • Create an ideal lip seal
  • Support optimal swallowing, chewing, and drinking
  • Eliminate dysfunctional oral habits
Problems that can occur with incorrect oral and facial muscle development
  • Tongue/Lip tie
  • Tongue thrust
  • Snoring
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Poor occlusion and chewing
  • Clenching, grinding, TMJ pain
  • Neck and back pain
  • Poor head and neck posture
  • Nasal congestion
  • Seasonal allergies
  • Mouth breathing
  • ADHD
  • Bed wetting
  • Periodontal Disease
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Post-orthodontic relapse
What is OMD?
Orofacial Myofunctional Disorder refers to the abnormal development of the oral and facial muscles and bones.
Why is mouth-breathing bad?
Mouth breathing leads to poor blood oxygenation which is linked to a number of health problems such as hypertension, heart failure, stress, anxiety, sleep deprivation, and inadequate growth and development.
What is a tongue or lip tie?
Abnormal development of the tongue or lip in which they are unable to freely move around therefore interfering with its proper function. Tongue/lip ties can potentially lead to problems with breathing, nursing, chewing, swallowing, and speech.
What is a tongue thrust?
Tongue thrust is a type of OMD where the tongue presses up against the teeth or in between them when swallowing. Improper tongue position can lead to poor occlusion and jaw development.
Why haven’t I heard of myofunctional therapy before?
Myofunctional therapy began in 1918 with the work of Dr. Alfred Rogers. However most healthcare providers never learned about it or trained in it as a part of their traditional education and learning. As modern healthcare is moving to a more collaborative approach between various fields, healthcare providers are learning and understanding the connection between oral and systemic health. The mouth is the open door for the whole body and oral health plays a huge role in overall health.
How does myofunctional therapy work?
Myofuncational therapy is a series of exercises and behavior modification techniques that promote proper tongue posture that can lead to improved breathing, chewing and swallowing.
What age should myofunctional therapy begin?
Adults and children alike are ideal candidates for myofunctional therapy.

CONTACT ME

Want to learn more about myofunctional therapy or book an appointment?

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